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Iran appoints hard-line clergy as top judge, calls for investigation of Middle East news

Gholamhossein Mohseni Ejei will succeed Ebrahim Raisi, who became president in August after winning the election on June 18.

In an international call for investigations into allegations of abuse, the top Iranian leader promoted a tough Muslim leader to be the head of the judiciary.

The current Deputy Minister of Justice, Gholamhossein Mohseni Ejei, will succeed Ebrahim Raisi, who became president in August after winning the presidential election. June 18th election.

Ten years ago, Egerin was included in the sanctions blacklist of the United States and the European Union because he played a role in suppressing popular uprisings when serving as intelligence minister in a controversial election.

As the new US government tries to negotiate a thaw with Tehran, choosing such a high-profile hardliner may further draw attention to allegations of Iran’s past abuse of power.

This week, a United Nations expert called for a new investigation into the role of Raisi in the deaths of thousands of political prisoners while serving as a judge in the 1980s. Raisy denied wrongdoing.

In a statement reported by the official media, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei called on Ajay to “promote justice, restore public rights, ensure legal freedom, supervise the correct implementation of laws, prevent crime, and resolutely combat corruption.”

Human rights groups criticized Raisi for being elected in a poll in which famous competitors were banned from running.

According to the national news agency IRNA, Khamenei urged Ajay in a statement to “promote justice, restore public rights, ensure legal freedom, monitor the correct implementation of laws, prevent crime, and resolutely combat corruption.”

United Nations Human Rights Investigator Javaid Rehman in Iran said this week that an independent investigation should be conducted into the allegations that the state ordered the execution of thousands of political prisoners in 1988, and Raisi’s role as deputy prosecutor in Tehran at the time.

“As I described in my report, the country has had widespread and systematic impunity for serious human rights violations in the past and present,” Rahman said.

“In domestic channels, there are very few, if any, real channels for accountability in accordance with international standards.”

Iran has repeatedly refuted criticisms of its human rights record, arguing that it is unfounded and the result of a lack of understanding of its Islamic law. It said its legal system is independent and not affected by political interests.

Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch Say Last month, Raisi’s election was a blow to human rights and called for an investigation of his role in the 1988 execution.



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